Kiteboard speed record

Shoot the breeze and stay in the loop with the unhinged and unhooked word on the street.
ronnie
Posts: 646
Joined: Tue Apr 11, 2006 11:26 am

Fri Nov 15, 2013 12:43 pm

james wrote:Maybe that's why it's slower than Alex's board? :wink:
Not always.

http://www.damienleroy.com/site/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
BrightonSurf
Posts: 707
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2011 6:31 pm

Fri Nov 15, 2013 12:47 pm

What would you say is a good speed in regular conditions on a twintip? I have a GPS watch and have been getting up to about 25mph or so and it feels pretty fast but obviously a long way off people who are doing actual speed runs.

For those interested in the speeds they go at based on my own observations of myself and others:

Going upwind at low/moderate speed: 15mph. (much below 15mph and you feel really slow)
Going across the wind at fairly high speed: 20mph.
Broad Reach, really blasting: 25mph.
Tone
Posts: 1996
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 3:09 pm

Fri Nov 15, 2013 2:49 pm

25mph on flatish water is quick.

To go super fast you need a mental amount of power and very flat water.
User avatar
Dragnfly
Posts: 1555
Joined: Fri Aug 15, 2008 1:54 pm

Fri Nov 15, 2013 3:22 pm

I got clocked doing 32 kts over 250m and it felt like I was going warp speed and about to explode. Can't imaging going nearly twice as fast. It must be mental.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
gazxtreme
Posts: 1072
Joined: Mon Apr 16, 2007 10:38 pm
Location: Cumbria
Contact:

Fri Nov 15, 2013 9:14 pm

You are all capable of doing 40 knots even on a standard twin tip, it will be psychological more than physical reasons if you are stuck around 25-30. It happened to me when I first became interested in speed, I was instantly happy in the 20s but had to work for months to break 30, I think part of the reason is when you're just cruising or free-riding you spend a lot of time governing your speed so this is inbuilt, speed riding is letting your instinct go and learning to control that overpowered downwind run of death. It took me a further year to break 40 knots comfortably and I now spend all my time wishing for more wind to go faster and wont rest until I get a peak of 50 knots, my current PB is 46.8 knots peak "big gust".
Now James is a different story, although he is an accomplished course racer he didn't speed ride then 2 years ago he spent the week at Weymouth speed week as a rep for the main sponsor and on a production twin tip speed board "underground" I think? he jumped on, didn't hold back and ended up winning, It's a shame that the few UK speed riders that exist are so far apart otherwise we may have better results when compared to the rest of the world. You need a lot of help "or I did" and it is there once you make contact with a couple of other speed riders. I had and still get loads of advice and info from Davo and board builder Mike Pacey "chipmunk"who's boards I have, more recently James has been a font of knowledge regarding kit. Networking is the way forward and it's good to see a few people becoming curious about speed. We really could do with a bigger kite fleet at Weymouth speed week, now is the time to start training for next October. For self build boards see the speed section on this forum
BrightonSurf
Posts: 707
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2011 6:31 pm

Fri Nov 15, 2013 10:20 pm

gazxtreme wrote:You are all capable of doing 40 knots even on a standard twin tip, it will be psychological more than physical reasons if you are stuck around 25-30.
How fast do you think it is possible to go in open sea conditions with waves and chop without risking a major wipe out every 5 seconds? Would be interesting to see how fast people go on course race equipment on the downwind runs.
User avatar
The Russian
Posts: 714
Joined: Sun May 15, 2005 10:19 am
Location: Witterings & Hayling

Fri Nov 15, 2013 11:15 pm

Hi Gazz, I think I need some Jedi mind trick help to get into the 40 knot region. I was very disappointed to see how low our efficiency ratios were at Weymouth compared to what I've heard the likes of Rob Douglas are doing. From talking to James, it seems that the equipment is fairly standard and all I can think is that we are simply not going for it hard enough!! It would be good to beat the windsurfers at Weymouth next year!!

To answer the question raised above, in open water on downwind runs about 25 kn is easily doable, and I've managed to get up to 30 in open water albeit this is only a peek and not over 500 m

It would be nice to get some more people on sports track live
Si-Fly
Posts: 77
Joined: Sun Jan 21, 2007 12:29 pm

Fri Nov 15, 2013 11:52 pm

Before I lost my GPS (only used 4 times!!) I managed peaks of 34/35 on standard twin between the chop/ waves at local beach. I'm not a very good sailor so higher speed should be easy for someone with skill :grin:

Si.

PS...could get over 30 on both boards I had then on 9, 12m kites, but they were small boards biggest was only 127*37 , not sure how fast I would get on today's bigger boards. I do have access to a GPS now so could set it up and try with my present 132*41 which does feel quite quick.

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 2
Si-Fly
Posts: 77
Joined: Sun Jan 21, 2007 12:29 pm

Sat Nov 16, 2013 12:02 am

Oh and you do get a great feeling as you bear away over powered and get ripped off the water as you dive the kite in a gust :shock::grin:
If you keep low and go with it all seems fine....you just think your about to die :mrgreen:

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 2
Tone
Posts: 1996
Joined: Wed Nov 03, 2004 3:09 pm

Sat Nov 16, 2013 8:58 am

The Russian wrote:I was very disappointed to see how low our efficiency ratios were at Weymouth compared to what I've heard the likes of Rob Douglas are doing. From talking to James, it seems that the equipment is fairly standard and all I can think is that we are simply not going for it hard enough!! It would be good to beat the windsurfers at Weymouth next year!!

On standard speed kit, i.e. the small, very thin boards, they are not efficient at all. They need 40+ knots to get up to 50 and it seems they need closer to 50 knots to get over 50. That's not great at all. However they are now using large speed boards/small course boards that run on three fins and ride flat. They are claiming 44 knots in 15 knots of wind which is mental. Course boards on flat deep water are relatively easy to go fast on but the water HAS To be flat.

my PB on my course board is 31knots in 14 knots of wind, I was on a 15m Flysurfer on butter flat water.

I am kinda losing interest in tricks at the moment, I seem to only want to kiteloop and go fast. Shame I need different kit for both.

tony
BrightonSurf
Posts: 707
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2011 6:31 pm

Sat Nov 16, 2013 11:23 am

Is 45 degrees downwind the fastest tack?
gazxtreme
Posts: 1072
Joined: Mon Apr 16, 2007 10:38 pm
Location: Cumbria
Contact:

Sat Nov 16, 2013 2:29 pm

BrightonSurf wrote:Is 45 degrees downwind the fastest tack?
Now then, interesting question :wink:
After a 500m run you may well end up at 45 degrees BUT that could depend on your speed. A kite can only go so fast through the air before it starts to drag and that's the point the wind window becomes dynamic and shifts angle "apparent wind" so the angle of the wind seems to shift and the effect of that is you star to curve your run the faster and further you go. If you look at GPS tracks on sportstracklive or here http://www.gps-kitesurfing.com/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; and click on the riders session information you will mostly see a continuous curve on the runs, it depends on the speed and the riders have different ways of attacking a run, I tend to hold edge for longer than James which showed up this year at Weymouth and he consistently beat me but had to tolerate running downwind into the choppier water, I was trying to stay in the flatter water but obviously scrubbed a knot or two off my runs. James may have a better or more technical way of explaining it that me as I am more of a doer than a thinker and don't analyse stuff as deeply as James, change needed for next year me thinks.
ronnie
Posts: 646
Joined: Tue Apr 11, 2006 11:26 am

Sat Nov 16, 2013 2:44 pm

Currently it is about 45 degrees, but it depends on the efficiency.
Sailrocket sails at over 2x the windspeed and will be sailing more across the wind. The future lies in getting more speed from less wind.

I think the future of kite speed is hinted at in this film. It just seems that kites actually have the right characteristics to work with a foil like the one Sailrocket uses. Speed would require a very reliable system for keeping the foil submerged and stable.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1tEw_mlUh7g" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
gazxtreme
Posts: 1072
Joined: Mon Apr 16, 2007 10:38 pm
Location: Cumbria
Contact:

Sat Nov 16, 2013 3:39 pm

That's a coincidence, James and I were talking with the innovator behind that system at Weymouth speed week this year, he is an old boy called Slade and turns up every year with his retired buddies and takes to the water in all kind of odd craft. Although most of his ideas seem non starters he did hit on something with that one, you'd not catch me attaching myself to it though. This year he was asking advice od using an LEI for propulsion with a boat, he and his buddies had been trying to learn to fly and launch In mostly too light winds but told us of their scare when they first hot launched the kite in a decent wind. We were unanimous in advising him to get some lessons in hope of him living long enough to get there next year. He is an amazing guy. The future is in what they were doing this year at Marthas Vineyard, slalom boards and super fast kites. Who knows we could end right back at the beginning on one of Cory's giant delta kites and skiis.
BrightonSurf
Posts: 707
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2011 6:31 pm

Sat Nov 16, 2013 4:38 pm

Thanks for the info on that. I was thinking that in lighter winds you might want to limit the downwind angle a bit since as far as I know you cannot travel downwind faster than the wind itself which is going to limit your maximum speed (I might be wrong on this but it maked alot of sense while thinking about it in the bath the other night :wink: ). So using this idea if you only have 15 miles an hour of wind and you are travelling at 45 degrees downwind using Pythagoras you can see that you maximum speed would be: sqrt(2) * 15 or 1.414 * 15 = 21 miles an hour. Any faster than this and you would be travelling directly downwind faster than the wind itself which doesnt make any sense. If the wind is really nuclear then this will be less of a problem since you are not going to catch up with the wind unless you are going extremely fast and using your speed to kill some of the power in the kite will probably help.
Post Reply