FAQ - Helmets and Head Injuries

What is a kitesurfing resource ?
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kitesurfa
Posts: 935
Joined: Fri Oct 29, 2004 10:59 pm
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What Helmet Standard

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Common European Norm (CEN) ~ http://www.cenorm.be
BS EN 966: 1996 Specification for helmets for airborne sports
BS EN 1077: 1996 Specification for helmets for alpine skiers
BS EN 1078: 1997 Helmets for pedal cyclists and for users of skateboards and roller-skates
BS EN 1385: Specification for helmets for water sports
BS EN 1080: 1997 Impact protection helmets for young children
BS EN 12492: 2000 Mountaineering
BS EN 13781: 2001 Snowmobiles and Bobsleighs

BS EN 812: Specification for Industrial bump caps. NOT suitable

Note - the CEN standard is the least demanding in impact testing requirements.

Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) ~ http://www.cpsc.gov

American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) ~ http://www.astm.org
ASTM F-1447-02 for Recreational Bicycling or Roller Skating
ASTM F-1492-00 for Skateboarding and Trick Roller Skating
ASTM F-1849-00 for Short Track Speed Ice Skating (Not Ice Hockey)
ASTM F-1952-00 for Downhill Mountain Bicycle Racing
ASTM F-2032-00 for BMX Cycling
ASTM F-2040-00 for skiing and snowboarding
ASTM F-1045-99 for Ice Hockey

WK3457 for motorcycles and motorscooters
WK3458 for Whitewater Sports


Snell Memorial Foundation ~ http://www.smf.org
N94 - Multisport Helmet Standard (in-line skating and skateboarding)
RS-98 Recreational Ski & Winter Sports
S-98 Ski & Winter Sports
B-90A, B-95A, B-90C, B-95C for use with Bicycles
K-98 for Karting
M2000 for Motorcycles
SA-2000 for Competitive Automotive Sports

N94 - Multi Impact ~ http://www.smf.org/standards/n94std.html


NOTE: Use helmets only for sports for which they are certified.
Use of helmets for sports for which they are not certified may lead to death or serious injury.

a helmet that meets the standards will only provide adequate protection to reduce the risk of head injury.


What Helmet Size

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Head Injuries ~ signs and symptoms

A human brain can withstand ~ 400G without ill effect.
From 400-700G causes concussion with a variable period of loss of consciousness.
700G+ results in permanent brain damage.

A helmet will help reduce the chance of a skull fracture and absorb some of the impact but will not stop
concussion if the impact is hard enough.
Nothing stops your brain hitting the inside of your skull.

The signs and symptoms of a head injury may occur immediately or develop slowly over several hours.
The following symptoms suggest a more serious head injury that requires emergency medical treatment:

Loss of consciousness, confusion, or drowsiness
Low breathing rate or drop in blood pressure
Convulsions
Fracture in the skull or face, facial bruising, swelling at the site of the injury, or scalp wound
Fluid drainage from nose, mouth, or ears (may be clear or bloody)
Severe headache
Initial improvement followed by worsening symptoms
Irritability (especially in children), personality changes, or unusual behavior
Restlessness, clumsiness, or lack of coordination
Slurred speech or blurred vision
Inability to move one or more of your limbs
Stiff neck or vomiting
Pupil changes
Inability to hear, see, taste, or smell


DO NOT....
... take aspirin, because it can increase the risk of bleeding. Seek medical attention first.
... wash a head wound that is deep or bleeding a lot.
... remove any object sticking out of a wound.
... move the person unless absolutely necessary.
... shake the person if he or she seems dazed.
... remove a person's helmet if you suspect a serious head injury.
... pick up a fallen child with any sign of head injury.
... drink alcohol within 48 hours of a serious head injury.

If any doubt call for an Ambulance/Medical Services.
karlquartz
Posts: 1467
Joined: Fri Nov 12, 2004 10:38 am
Location: London :-(

one of the standards listed has a not alongside stating 'not suitable'.

Does this mean that all the other standards are considered adequate/suitable for kitesurfing?

If so, on what grounds has this decision been made and who by?

Can you sumarise the tests involved when grading helmets?
kitesurfa
Posts: 935
Joined: Fri Oct 29, 2004 10:59 pm
Contact:

karlquartz wrote:one of the standards listed has a not alongside stating 'not suitable'.
Does this mean that all the other standards are considered adequate/suitable for kitesurfing?
If so, on what grounds has this decision been made and who by?
No, which is why I included the lines

NOTE: Use helmets only for sports for which they are certified.
Use of helmets for sports for which they are not certified may lead to death or serious injury.

Currently there is no recognised Helmet standard for KiteSurfing, the nearest would be Wakeboarding or waterskiing. which is covered under BS EN 1385 Water Sports or its equivalent.

Other helmets I have seen advertised suitable for kitesurfing by the manufacture is BS EN 1077 which is the specification for helmets for alpine skiers.
The choice to wear one or not is down to the rider, as it is only a recomendation, not requirement. One exception could be unless entering a competition and the rules state helmets must be worn. It is then down to the organisers to state which safety standard is/is not acceptable.

What grounds ? - The rating marked above as not suitable, is because it is the standard for Industrial Hard Hats as used on building sites. To protect against falling objects etc.
Can you sumarise the tests involved when grading helmets?
No, I do not have copies of the Standards.
Last edited by kitesurfa on Tue Dec 04, 2007 9:45 am, edited 1 time in total.
karlquartz
Posts: 1467
Joined: Fri Nov 12, 2004 10:38 am
Location: London :-(

er, thanks, yep clearly I didn't read it properly.

Still not clear on why one class singled out as not suitable - presume that means not suitable for any sports use then, rather than kitesurfing. Don't worry, no need to answer, just thinking out loud.

I have often wondered if wake/watersports lids are suited to kitesurfing - other than superficially - ie they are designed for use on the water.

As far as I am aware, most serious ks injuries to the head have been due to heavy impact with solid objects/surfaces on land, including falling from heights.

Presume that higher degree of protection may be ideal in ks over other watersports?

Also there are other issues - especially when learning - need not to reduce hearing, need to look up a lot and not have the lid forced forward over the eyes while still protecting ocipital area, need to look bling etc.

I think helmets in competitions should be compulsory if only to encourage everyone to wear them for recreational use. Problem is, if you enforce helmets and there is not a clearly defined suitable standard...
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